LIVE YOUR ROUTE…

Sierra Espuña (blue) and Sierra de la Tercia (red)

The climate is semi-arid Mediterranean with warm summers and cool winters. The annual rainfall, 300 mm, stands out for its irregularity. The flora includes the so-called mesomediterranean floor species with pine, kermes oak, esparto grass, rockrose, juniper, hawthorn and thyme. We find mammals such as wild boar, Barbary sheep, white hare, fox, and squirrel. In addition, we can easily spot birds like choughs, crag martins and jays. And sporadically, we can also see birds of prey flying over our heads like hawks or eagles, or even, at dusk, different types of owls.

A LAND OF CONTRASTS

One of the most fantastic attractions of the Region of Murcia is, without a doubt, the Regional Park of Sierra Espuña, located in the Betic Mountain Range and comprising the commonwealth formed by the municipalities of Aledo, Alhama, Lorca, Mula, Pliego and Totana. In it surroundings, the walker can marvel at and enjoy other places of outstanding natural, geological, cultural and scenic interest such as the Mediterranean pine forest of Sierra de la Tercia, the humid microclimate of the Strait of Arboleja or the semi-desert area of Gebas ravines.

A place for adventure

 have a very rugged topography becoming especially attractive for all kinds of sports and leisure activities (hiking, climbing, mountain biking, paragliding, ultralight flights, caving, among others).

The Strait of Agualeja or Arboleja, in Aledo, is one of the most beautiful natural and geological secrets hidden in the surroundings of Sierra Espuña. It is a place that takes you back to the origins, where it seems that we return to take our first steps.

The Strait of Agualeja or Arboleja, in Aledo, is one of the most beautiful natural and geological secrets hidden in the surroundings of Sierra Espuña. It is a place that takes you back to the origins, where it seems that we return to take our first steps.

The Barbary sheep reproduces quickly, so it is not difficult to come across large herds along the route. This image was taken on the slope of the hill of La Bastida.

The Barbary sheep reproduces quickly, so it is not difficult to come across large herds along the route. This image was taken on the slope of the hill of La Bastida.

Coleoptera is common in the caves and shelters scattered throughout Sierra Espuña Regional Park and its surroundings. A specimen of the gray-eared bat (Plecotus austriacus) photographed in Cueva de la Pólvora (en: gunpowder  cave).

Coleoptera is common in the caves and shelters scattered throughout Sierra Espuña Regional Park and its surroundings. A specimen of the gray-eared bat (Plecotus austriacus) photographed in Cueva de la Pólvora (en: gunpowder  cave).

One of the most beautiful ophidians we could encounter during our routes is the horseshoe snake (Hemorrhois hipocrepis). This young specimen, specifically, crossed our path on the way to the excavations of La Bastida.

One of the most beautiful ophidians we could encounter during our routes is the horseshoe snake (Hemorrhois hipocrepis). This young specimen, specifically, crossed our path on the way to the excavations of La Bastida.

Cynara humilis, or, as it is commonly known, the common thistle in Gebas Ravines (Alhama de Murcia).

Cynara humilis, or, as it is commonly known, the common thistle in Gebas Ravines (Alhama de Murcia).

View from Sierra Espuña towards the SE. In the background, the Guadalentín Valley stretches, to the right, the southern foothills of Sierra de la Tercia.

View from Sierra Espuña towards the SE. In the background, the Guadalentín Valley stretches, to the right, the southern foothills of Sierra de la Tercia.

At the foot of the Lébor dam, a short distance from La Bastida, following the riverbed from the east, the imposing cliffs and exquisite karst formations stand out, inviting the walker to stop continuously to contemplate the surroundings.

At the foot of the Lébor dam, a short distance from La Bastida, following the riverbed from the east, the imposing cliffs and exquisite karst formations stand out, inviting the walker to stop continuously to contemplate the surroundings.

In the foreground, the Asphodelus fistulosus, commonly known as gamoncillo or

In the foreground, the Asphodelus fistulosus, commonly known as gamoncillo or “varica de San José”, stands out. In the background, there is a barley crop, the Argaric staple food and, finally, a concentration of esparto used then and still today for the manufacture of basketry and footwear, cordage, although every day less and less.

Flying over Totana in an ultralight aircraft towards La Bastida.

Flying over Totana in an ultralight aircraft towards La Bastida.